What you get is what you see Why RAW shooting is closer to what the human eye sees

  This article comes from Hummingbird.com

   When many people get their first camera, the default shooting format is often the common JPG. For some more experienced photographers, their preferred format will actually be the RAW format of various cameras, such as Nikon’s NEF, Sony’s ARW, Canon CR2 or CR3, etc., and the RAW format of various camera manufacturers. The names are not the same, but they are all consistent in nature—all are the raw data of the camera sensor. And here, I will also introduce you to the advantages of shooting in RAW format, especially for landscape photography.

What you get is what you see Why RAW shooting is closer to what the human eye sees

   Photography is to a large extent the art of light, and we often Will learn how to correctly master and control the lights through repeated experiments. However, the biggest challenge in photography is that the sensor of a digital camera cannot perceive light like the human eye-the sensor’s perception of light is linear, while our eyes’ perception of light is quite different. The human eye can see a variety of tones, and we can see the details of shadows in a very high-contrast picture, while reducing the impact of highlights on us. And if it is described in the way of photography, it is to add a non-linear curve. We can also compare this curve with the function of the shadow and highlight sliders in Photoshop. When we are editing, we adjust the shadows and highlights to get an image similar to what we see.

   Let’s take the photo taken by OleHenrik Skjelstad in Jotunheimen, Norway as an example. He photographed an opening of the sun in the clouds, and the whole scene has a high contrast. The image below shows how the camera sensor reflects the entire picture when I expose it like the highlights seen by my eyes.

What you get is what you see Why RAW shooting is closer to what the human eye sees

   Pentax K- 1. Pentax 15-30mm, ISO100, 1/350 seconds, f/11

   and the picture below is a picture that can accurately reflect the picture seen by the human eye after the later stage.

What you get is what you see Why RAW shooting is closer to what the human eye sees

  Later: Exposure +3, shadow +57, black +36, highlight -100

   Since the RAW file is derived from the raw data of the camera’s sensor, it means that many shadow details can be extracted from it, and it can also be dialogue Fine-tune the balance. Although the JPG format is convenient, it has undergone lossy processing by the camera, and a large amount of information is lost, which cannot be reconstructed. However, even if shooting in RAW format, there are limits that can be adjusted, which also depends on the performance of the sensor itself; or if a lossy compressed RAW format is used, the image information will still be lost. From JPG to RAW, it may bring a series of challenges to storage and later, but it is worth it. We have more control over the pictures we take.

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