Shooting skills: common sceneries in portrait photography

   In photography, the use of scenes is very important. It can determine the shooting style, highlight the photographer’s intention, and clearly express the theme. In portrait shooting, the main commonly used scenes are divided into four types: panorama, mid-range, close-up, and close-up, which correspond to four types of portrait photography: full-body, half-length, portrait above the chest, and close-up. Today, let us talk about the characteristics of these scenes.

  1. Panorama-expressing the whole character

   Panorama can express all of the subject. Any picture that can explain the whole picture of the subject is collectively called the panorama. For example, the whole picture of a building indicates it. Picture of the overall structure. In portrait photography, the panorama is a full-body photo of the person being photographed. Since the character is in a state of full-body appearance in the scene, it is more important to consider the shape of the character and the background when shooting panoramic portraits. If the character is in a standing posture, you can consider avoiding standing upright. You can make the subject move the center of gravity of the head or body slightly, and make some appropriate actions. Consider using some simple backgrounds to highlight the subject, but you need to avoid it. The background is too messy to interfere with the line of sight; if the character is in a sitting position, the character can be put in postures such as bent legs, tucked knees, etc., so that the photo will not look too blunt, and you can also choose some life-like backgrounds. Make the picture look more cordial.

Shooting skills: common sceneries in portrait photography

   Nikon official sample

  2, medium shot-half-length portrait

   To shoot a half-length portrait, refers to shooting a person’s thighs or parts above the thighs, including thighs, waist, hands, chest and head. Half-length photos can be divided into half-length photos and upper-body photos. Half-length photos generally include the part above the legs of the character, and upper-length photos include the part above the waist of the character. Half-length portraits can allow the person to be photographed to occupy most of the position of the photo, and can reserve a part of the space to explain the background of the person, so it is commonly used in news pictures used in magazines or some commercial models. For busts, we must pay attention to the facial expressions, eyes and other details of the subject, and handling these details can make our photos better. As for the background, because the characters occupies most of the photos, the requirements for the scene are not high. Small rooms and narrow corridors are ideal shooting locations for half-length photos.

Shooting skills: common sceneries in portrait photography

   Nikon official sample

  3. Close-up, close-up-focus on the part of the person.

   Shoot close-up portraits, which refer to the scene including the part above the chest. When using this kind of scene to shoot portraits, the screen should pay attention to the expression of the character’s attitude, mood and details, and handle the character’s head posture and facial expressions. The close-up usually refers to the scene that includes the part above the shoulder of the person, and it usually reflects the whole picture with parts of the person being photographed such as eyes and hands. For close-ups and close-ups, since the main character occupies almost the entire picture, the background can be ignored or blurred out with shallow depth of field most of the time. The use of these two scenes to shoot portraits should pay attention to expressing the local characteristics of the characters, and the scenes should mobilize the imagination of the audience from the partial association of the whole scene, and enrich the content of the picture.

Shooting skills: common sceneries in portrait photography

   Nikon official sample

   In fact, in addition to the above four types of scenes, there is another type of sceneries that are distant scenes, but the distant scenes are more often used in landscape photography, so I won’t repeat them here. After understanding these common scene features in portrait photography, photographers can judge the scene they should choose when shooting portraits according to their own intentions, and then adjust the focal length and parameters according to the specific characteristics of the scene. In a future article In, we will continue to combine different scenes to explain the operation skills of different scenes.

Author:SINA,If you need to reprint,please indicate the source:http://www.todaycamera.com/camera-reviews/shooting-skills-common-sceneries-in-portrait-photography